Philosophy – “The Two-Step Sequence to Problem Solving” – 2/13/2021

“Without the desire to care, one cannot advance to where one solves what is wrong. With all the knowledge in the world, there is none that can teach a person to admit a problem exists.”

– Modern Romanticism

Wandering to a bookstore to purchase a volume that teaches a person how to solve a problem, will not solve anything deeper than that.

The deepest problem that a person suffers from, is the unwillingness to care for what is wrong. One can have all the world’s knowledge, with no care for how to apply it. Whereas, it is possible to solve any problem, when the first step to this sequence, has been conquered.

The first step, the desire to care…

Versus, the second step, the knowledge applied for the problem to be solved…

And, one cannot skip the first step, to move onto the second. This is because, as it’s already been stated, one cannot solve an issue, without the genuine care for it.

An “excuse” or a “reason” for why one cannot accomplish their task, may come in all forms. One can say the words, “I do not know how.” Though, their lacking knowledge, for how to solve their issue, is never the true reason. Their truest reason is that they do not care enough. Such means, they have not conquered the first step, in this “two-step sequence to problem solving”.

This is how rehabilitation centers fail, for addicts. What with all the knowledge such a center possesses, will become useless when the addict, themselves, have not conquered the first step. Such an addict can only ever move onto the second step, when the first one has been accomplished.

Having a heart, is the first step.

Having a mind, is the second step.

Why else does a person enter a bookstore to purchase a volume on “how-to”, if not having accomplished the first step? It is then an impossible task, for any author, to write a book to teach a person to be motivated enough to solve their issue. This is to say that one cannot teach a person to care. Such motivation needs to come, from within.

One can receive advice from another, though only ever in requirement for sheer knowledge. Neither a friend, nor a therapist, can teach a person to care about what is wrong.